Silt Pumping Applications: What You Should Know

Silt Pumps - Mud Sucker

Silt Pumps – Mud Sucker

When we hear about silt pumping applications it usually involves pumping from a mining site, fruit juice concentrate or dredging application.  Often, job site operators have contained the silt-laden wastewater in either a holding tank or tote tank. Typically, the liquid waste must be treated or pumped to a larger containment area. As you can imagine, the internals of the pump must be able to handle the constant abrasive and gritty substances passing through it otherwise, the components will most certainly prematurely fail.

One of our mining customers in Nye County Nevada USA highlights a common application when pumping silt:

Our application involves pumping from two 1600 gallon cone tanks into a larger reservoir for treatment later on.  The liquid is a silt mixture from a mining operation.  We have tried some trash pumps and other submersibles but the grit keeps destroying the internals.   Do you have any product recommendations? Don M. Nye County, NV

In this case we recommended that Don use a professional double diaphragm pump with specialized valve chambers to better manage pumping silt. We also designed the pump with a double suction and double discharge arrangement so the operator could pump either one or two tanks at a time depending on which tank reached its capacity first.  The 2B-DD also includes butterfly valves to make pumping out one or two tanks a lot easier. When speaking with Don, we noticed that there might be the chance that the pump could become exposed to a closed valve in the system which may lead to pressure situation causing catastrophic damage to the pump. In this case, we engineered the Mud Sucker 2B-DD with pressure relief valves to help protect against any blockages in the line or a closed valve.

After six months, the pump is operating as expected with minor wear on the diaphragms and check balls. Given that the pump operates outdoors and on an eight hour /6 day a week schedule, the component wear is minimal. The Mud Sucker 2B-DD is an excellent custom solution for all kinds of silt application. More information is available here.

 

What You Didn’t Know About Double Disc Pumps

Double Disc Pump installation

Double Disc Pump installation

Wastecorp recently exhibited at a national water quality conference where we had a chance to discuss our exciting double disc pump technology with engineers, end users and pump distributors. We addressed some of the most common issues/questions below:

Can a Double Disc Pump Have Ball Valves?

Yes. In fact, ball valve technology is helping to usher in the next era of double disc style pumps. The ball valves help to break up solids and make pumping thicker municipal sewage easier. The ball valves also make it much easier to maintain the pump. With the traditional clack valve style double disc pump, debris can get stuck in the clack and trunnions which may reduce pumping productivity. With a Sludge Pro® Double Disc Pump you simply open up the valve chambers, check for any debris and blockages and get back to business.  Just because one type of double disc pump has a clack valve doesn’t mean others have to.

Is The Term Double Disc Pump a Registered Trademark?

No. In fact, it is unlawful for any one manufacturer to place a registered trademark “®” designation next to the generic term “double disc pump”. It hurts competition and misleads consumers.

Do You Have to Crawl Under a Sludge Pro® Double Disc Pump to Conduct Maintenance Like You Do Other Makes?

Absolutely not. Wastecorp would never design a pump where an operator or maintenance person had to crawl underneath a pump with hundreds of lbs potentially hanging overhead. This poses a safety risk and may lead to serious injury or death.

Is there really a difference between the clack valve style double disc pump and Wastecorp’s Sludge Pro Double Disc Pumps?

Yes. First, the Sludge Pro® includes a hydraulic jacking system that raises the shaft so the trunnion and wet section can be worked on while the maintenance person is standing up. Who would want to crawl underneath a pump to conduct maintenance?  Second, municipal sewage involves a lot of grit and solids to be pumped. Wastecorp designed a disc pump better able to manage solids and thicker sewage.  Third, you won’t find swan necks or clack valves on a Sludge Pro® A pump that involves removing the swan neck to access the pump internals may cause reduced productivity at a WWTP.  Belt and pulleys are another time waster that you won’t find on a Sludge Pro® double disc pump. Energy efficient direct drive systems reduce the motor hp required so the sewage pumping operation can operate more efficiently.

What is the difference between a single housing design and a three housing design?

A three housing design doesn’t really mean anything. It is the preference of the pump manufacturer. However a three piece pump body design may lead to increased parts to replace and repair and possibly more down time for the facility. A single housing design may improve access to the pumps internals and reduce the amount of pump maintenance people needed to work on the pump.

What drive systems are available for double disc pumps?

Electric driven and engine driven (usually) diesel are preferred by most facilities.

Where can I find Engineering Specifications on Double Disc Pumps?

You can find them on wastecorp.com or click on this link and we will take you to the double disc pump selection page. You can also call Sludge Pro Double Disc Pumps at 1-888-829-2783 or email info@wastecorp.com

 

 

 

 

How to Find New Diaphragms for an Old Diaphragm Pump

Diaphragms for any kind of diaphragm pump

Diaphragms for any kind of diaphragm pump

One of the frequent calls we hear from customers is that they either have an older diaphragm pump make or need replacement diaphragms for their newer diaphragm pump. Some genuine replacement parts are easier to find than others. The good news is that replacement diaphragms and other parts for almost any kind of diaphragm pump are available for pumps dating back as far as the 1940’s.

The general procedure for measuring your current diaphragm and getting your pump back to operating condition is easier than you think. There are three general steps to follow to getting the pump parts you need.

Step 1: Measuring Your Diaphragm

Do three quick measurements. Measure the outside diameter (OD) of the diaphragm. Replacement diaphragms generally range from 5” and go all the way up to 15” OD’s. Measure the height of the diaphragm. A tip here is to measure from the bottom of the diaphragm laying on a flat surface to the top. Finally, measure the inner diameter (ID) or the top of the diaphragm. This is especially important so your diaphragm parts supplier can establish where the diaphragm clamps onto the clamping plate.

How to measure your diaphragm

How to measure your diaphragm

Step 2: Selecting Your Diaphragm Material

Viton, Santoprene and Neoprene are generally the different varieties of diaphragm materials available. For general wastewater pumping, Santoprene and Neoprene have proven to be effective. For corrosive and abrasive fluids your pump parts repair person may suggest a different material like Viton. You should talk to a pump expert before making this decision however.

Step 3: Have your Pump Make, Model and Serial Number Ready

Your diaphragm pump parts provider can get information to you with greater speed if you have all of this information ready when you order. There are many pump makes out there like Mud Sucker, Mud Hog, Edson, AMT, Homelite, CH&E, Tsurumi, Wilden, Multiquip, Wacker are all makes that have been around for some time and each has their own diaphragm sizing and recommended materials.

Wastecorp is one pump manufacturer who also has a replacement parts division for many makes of diaphragm pumps. They also dedicate a website page to finding the correct diaphragm size. Check it out here

Planning for New Digester Pumps


As many know in the wastewater treatment industry, anaerobic digesters play a key part in biodegradable waste and sewage/sludge management. Many digesters, especially in northern areas of the USA are going through extensive refurbishment or replacement in recent years due to aging infrastructure and population expansion. Climate changes in the Northeast has also played a role in nudging local government to invest in sewage treatment pumping equipment as unpredictable storms can overload the system. New processes in the industry such as screens, grinder pumps have also helped to spur investment in new infrastructure.

Types of Digester Pumps

Plunger pumps, rotary lobe pumps, progressive cavity pumps and double disc pumps are the most common types of digester pumps. These technologies have all been around for decades, but plunger pumps remain one of the preferred pump technologies available to pump municipal sewage, food processing waste and more. One of the primary reasons for this is that as most operators know, sewage can be unpredictable in terms of grit content, thickness of the slurry or presence of solids or stringy material (common in municipal sewage) A plunger pump uses a cylinder to force the liquid from the suction to the discharge side of the pump. Rotary lobe pumps and progressive cavity pumps tend to use complicated engineering to transfer sewage which can clog up the pump which then needs to be disassembled and rebuilt. Plunger pumps are designed to handle variations in sewage and solids and they almost never clog. The only downside to these pump is that they are really not meant for straight water applications.

Who is Involved in Selecting Anaerobic Digestion Pumps?

Typically the city, town or municipality hires a consulting engineering firm to make recommendations on the types of pumps needed. Often, facility staff is valuable in contributing to the future of the new facility because they have seen which pumps work and those that have had problems. Pump manufacturers are also valuable partners in the selection process because they too have project experience and can help the consulting engineer save time and money in planning for the new pumping equipment.

Check out a project recently completed for the City of New York’s Hunts Point WPCP in the Bronx, NY. This case study shows a typical anaerobic digestion pump in action. More information is also available at Wastecorp.com

Trash Pump Manufacturing in North America

Trash pump manufacturing in North America: Wastecorp employee assembles a Trash Flow TFCC-M8, 8

Trash pump manufacturing in North America: Wastecorp employee assembles a Trash Flow TFCC-M8, 8″ diesel driven trash pump with pumping capabilities up to 2700 GPM.

There has been increasing media attention lately about manufacturing making a resurgence on North America shores. The trash pump manufacturing business is no different. But to companies like Wastecorp who has manufactured trash pumps, diaphragm pumps , plunger pumps and now double disc pumps on North American soil for over 20 years, we are slightly taken aback by the renewed focus.

Our Trash Flow Trash pumps are a good example about how manufacturing in North America, never really left. Over the last 18 months for example we have seen a nice surge in business from municipalities and industries looking for high quality trash pumps within a reasonable lead time. What does reasonable lead time mean in the world of trash pumps you might ask? With the Trash Flow, you are looking at between 3-7 week delivery on most of our models, ranging from bare pumps (simply replacing an old pump with a new one while utilizing the same motor or taking out a Gorman Rupp T Series and installing a new Trash Flow in its place) to engine driven trash pumps mounted on a trailer or skid mounted.

Now you might say “that’s great that you manufacture your pumps here, so what are the prices like?”. To clear up any misconceptions, the pricing of Trash Flow trash pumps are in many cases lower than comparable 2”-12” models with pumping capabilities up to 6300 GPM.