How to Pump Machine Coolant

Machine Coolant Pumps

Machine Coolant Pumps

Pumps for machine coolant transfer and circulation are used by many heavy manufacturing industries such as pipe fabricators, the steel industry, aircraft manufacturing, automobile manufacturers and more.

The idea is to get a pump that not only pumps or circulates the machine coolant but

also the traces of by-product from your specific industry application. For example, in the pipe fabrication industry, you might have a slurry of metal filings that end up in the machine coolant. At an automobile assembly facility you might have plastic or metal bits mixed in with the coolant that needs to be pumped.

How to Pump Coolant

How to Pump Coolant


The video you see here demonstrates a typical machine coolant pumping operation at a pipe fabrication facility or steel mill. The coolant bath is circulated and the Mud Sucker diaphragm pump you see here pumps both the coolant and the accumulated metal slurry that is part of the process.

In this specific case, the pump’s suction line draws from a 10’ deep pit. The fluid travels up the suction line and is discharged back into the machine coolant reservoir.

A few things need to be clarified here. First, we strongly recommend suction and discharge gauges. Yes, it costs a bit more, but the operator can clearly see what the pump suction and discharge pressure readings are. Since most diaphragm pumps can transfer a maximum of 22 psi, you want to make sure you understand how the pump is operating. Overpressurization of the pump is not something you want.
Second, you should make sure you order your pump with pulsation dampeners. This is important (but not critical) when pumping thin liquids like machine coolant. Why? Thinner liquids tend to cause the diaphragm pump to vibrate a bit more. While not harmful to the pump, you simply want to reduce the kick to the suction and discharge hoses with every stroke. Finally, you want to keep the piping arrangement as simple as possible. Straight in and straight out maximizes the productivity of the pump.

The photo you see here shows several elbows on the discharge line . It also shows the discharge line of a different pump piped into the same line. This should be avoided, as when fluid moves through pipe or hose, it is trying to find the easiest way to escape. The problem is that it can put unnecessary pressure on the pump and reduce efficiency. If you have questions about the set up at your specific facility, you should speak to a technical support representative to review the piping arrangement.

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