Commercial Waste Trap Grease Pumps – What to know

Commercial grease trap pumps using electric diaphragm pumps

Commercial grease trap pumps using electric diaphragm pumps

Waste trap grease pumps for commercial applications can be used for a wide variety of applications involving pumping grease from the source to a suitable treatment area. One such pump for pumping waste trap grease is the Mud Sucker Diaphragm pump which is used in shopping centers, hospitals, school cafeterias, restaurants, prisons and other government institutions where pumping grease for treatment is required.

For example, an engineer in Miami, Florida was tasked with designing a pump system for a large mixed use shopping center with restaurants and other attractions that involve pumping from grease pits to a collection area. The challenge was configuring the piping through the multi-level shopping center which was under construction and meeting city bylaws for proper waste trap grease treatment. The engineering firm and the contractor contacted Wastecorp to inquire about the Mud Sucker Diaphragm Pump’s track record in grease trap waste pumping.

Grease trap discharge line for commercial waste trap grease pumping

Grease trap discharge line for commercial waste trap grease pumping

Positioning the Waste Trap Grease Pumps Continue reading

Portable Waste Oil Recovery Pumps

Waste oil pump on military base

Waste oil pump on military base

Waste oil recovery and pumping is a hot topic right now in the world of pumps. For facilities with multiple storage tanks or sites, a portable pump may be a great option considering the alternatives. Traditionally vacuum pump trucks have been one of the only options available to transfer waste oil from tanks, cargo, tanker ships, on site storage facilities and more. This is no longer the case.

The Mud Sucker diaphragm pump system has a variety of sizes and options to transfer all kinds of waste oils no matter the size of the job or facility. For example, at this North American military base (pictured left), the customer uses Wastecorp’s Mud-Sucker 2F-MC diaphragm pump with wheel kit. This powerful pump is moved easily from site to site and transfers up to 25 GPM. With few moving parts and a contoured velocity channel, this pump is virtually maintenance free.

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How to Pump Out Waste Oil

Waste oil and waste fluids pump out for cars

Waste oil and waste fluids pump out for cars

Pumping out waste motor oil, gear oil  and other fluids like coolant, and grease can be easy for auto repair jobs, boat service and repair and tractor service for farms and utility vehicles.  Wastecorp waste collection systems store old engine fluids in a waste tote tank and can be outfitted with mobile systems like the model you see here. This makes it easier to move around the service area to pump out oil from multiple cars, trucks, boats, tractors or even locomotives. The trick is to find the system that works best for your needs. The 100 gallon model that you see here is ideal for medium to large size service centers making it easy to pump out a days worth of vehicles without having to discharge the tank. Wastecorp also offers custom fleet specs for national service centers to integrate the pump out into the training program for employees. Contact Wastecorp to learn more about waste oil and fluid collection systems.

Pumping Out Tanks With Diaphragm Pumps

Mobile Diaphragm Pump

You name the tank that needs to be pumped out and we have heard of at least a few customer applications that correspond with that tank. Underground septic tanks, lagoon transfer, transport truck tankers, locomotive tankers, waste pits and waste vegetable oil drums are among the most popular. What you have to keep in mind is that in most of these applications, you will need a pump that can easily maneuver in areas to access the discharge valve or at least some place where you can place the suction hose.

Randy K. from Columbus, GA, contacted Wastecorp about his settling tank pump out operation:

“I Need assistance to find the correct pumps to transfer mud consistency wastewater, brackish water and abrasive media out of settling tanks at a mining application we have. We have a need for three or four pumps that need to be mobile. We have been told that a diaphragm pump with check balls might work. The pump also needs to be able to handle gritty waste water and slurry. We are pumping up around 8-10’ and pumping out vertically to a screen another 60’ What do you recommend?” Randy K. Columbus GA.

Well Randy, it has long been known in the pump business that when you have a variety of media to pump, your pump must be versatile. The Mud Sucker B Series Professional diaphragm pump is one of those products. Take the Mud Sucker® 3B Series you see in the photo above. This is being transported around a six mile long public space along New York City’s West side. This Mud Sucker pumps everything from septic waste, cleaning up construction wastewater containing aggregate, waste vegetable oil from City operated restaurants and more. The check balls help to manage the solids and if something should get stuck in the pump you simply unbolt the valve covers, remove the check ball, find the blockage and you’re back in business. This is like a 5-10 minute process.

The Mud Sucker® B Series can pump up to 80 GPM and transfer fluids up to 300’ vertically so you will have plenty of pumping power. Keep in mind, that as wastewater gets thicker these values can vary. The pump you see above is shown with an off road utility trailer that we manufactured for the client’s needs. This is a heavy duty trailer but adapts to the tight New York City spaces that the pump must maneuver through. The best part is, we can manufacture these pumps and trailer systems specifically for your needs with hose bins, lockable storage containers and tanks for waste water collection and fresh water distribution. More information can be found at www.wastecorp.com or by calling 1-888-829-2783.

How to Pump Wet Wipes and Cooking Oil

Pumping wet wipes at a municipal wastewater treatment facility

Pumping wet wipes at a municipal wastewater treatment facility

Wastecorp employees read a story posted on YAHOO! from Yahoo and Thames Water’s Website (Thames water is responsible for sewer maintenance in London, England) about a “fatberg” comprised of cooking oil, wet wipes and more which was roughly the size of a Boeing 747. In our weekly global meeting, many on the call contributed to the discussion because in almost every pump markets globally, our customers have to manage either issues relating to cooking oil or solids in the sewer system.  The manufacturers of wet wipes worldwide have said that they are researching and developing new products that will help to reduce the clumping issue. But the primary contributor to this problem is not the wet wipes; no one should be dumping cooking oil down the drain – ever. As the YAHOO! article says, when you dump hot cooking oil down the drain into the cold sewer system the fat congeals and clings to anything including the wipes, toilet paper or other solids.

Related: Thames Water Press Release about the “Fatberg”

Here is North America; municipal wastewater treatment operators routinely voice their concerns to us about the use of wet pipes by the general public and then flushing them down the toilet.  “Do you guys make a pump that can better handle the wet wipes” is a question Wastecorp frequently receives at our sludge pump call centers.  Jim K. from Winston Salem North Carolina tells it like it is:

“ All these wet wipes that come into our mid-size WWTP are wreaking havoc on our pumps. We use rotary lobe pumps and progressive cavity pumps and they just clog them causing them to fail and then thousands worth of damage. We need to go a different route.  Our city engineer was looking at Wastecorp’s website and suggested we ask about either your plunger pump or double disc pump options.” We need some guidance here please.”  Jim K. – Winston Salem, NC

Well Jim, the rotary lobe and progressive cavity companies will sell you the same story: go with our pumps – they’re new. They are leaving out an important fact most lobe and progressive cavity pumps have been around just as long as plunger pumps, (+- 75 years) and most of lobe and progressive cavity pumps don’t do a good job of handling solids. When it comes to plunger pumps, they are a lot less likely to clog. The check balls and pistons move sludge and wet wipes and send them on their way. You should also consider a screen and a grinder in your WWTP process, but having a pump more capable of handling solids will go along way.

Jim, like your city engineer said, many WWTP’s your size have selected either a plunger pump or a double disc pump to manage these wet wipes. We see a lot of facilities your size going the route of the Sludge Master® PE-941 SSIII or our Sludge Pro® 4DDWP™ Double Disc Pump Series. Unless your facility has an endless budget to keep replacing rotors, stators and bearings your facility would be wise to consider other pump options. More info can be found at www.wastecorp.com

Related: Waste oil pumps and containment systems