Double Disc Pump Comparison Guide for Engineers, Operators and Pump Distributors

Compare Sludge Pro and Penn Valley Pumps

Compare Sludge Pro and Penn Valley Pumps

Wastecorp has published a double disc pump comparison guide for consulting engineers, end users and pump distributors. This resource explains the difference between two different pump types and the methods each use to pump sewage, sludge and wastewater. You can download this comparison guide by clicking here or continuing to read below.

Who is Wastecorp?
Wastecorp Pumps is an ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 certified pump manufacturer. Wastecorp manufactures the Sludge Pro brand double disc pump. The company specializes in sewage pump and wastewater pump manufacturing. This includes multiple products for municipal/industrial applications. Wastecorp has manufactured pumps since 1993 in the United States and Canada. Information about Sludge Pro Double Disc Pumps can be found at 
http://www.wastecorp.com/disc-pumps.html

What is a Penn Valley Pump (PVP)? 
The Penn Valley pump is a diaphragm pump. PVP has fully acknowledged this in their patent # US 7,559,753 B2. The patent references George Burrage’s (a family member of PVP President) patent application # GB 2013287A as the basis of construction for the PVP pump. Nowhere in GB 2013287A does it reference a disc at all. This legal document fully acknowledges the fact that the Penn Valley pump is a diaphragm pump. PVP also Continue reading

Dirty Secrets in The Double Disc Pump Business

Compare Sludge Pro and Penn VAlley Double Disc Pumps

Compare Sludge Pro and Penn Valley Double Disc Pumps

Things are heating up in the marketplace for double disc pumps and competition has a great way of exposing the true colors of competitors.  Hearing what one double disc pump competitor says about another reinforces the  need to do your homework so you are getting an accurate picture of the benefits and drawbacks of each make. Continue reading

Primary Sludge Pumps | What you Should Know

Primary Sludge Pumps

Primary Sludge Pumps

With tough sludge pumping applications like those found at municipal Wastewater Treatment Facilities, (WWTP’s) having the right primary sludge pumps can help reduce hassles and your spare parts budget down the road. This was just the case for the City of Meridian’s recent wastewater treatment facility upgrade and expansion in Meridian, Idaho.

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What You Didn’t Know About Double Disc Pumps

Double Disc Pump installation

Double Disc Pump installation

Wastecorp recently exhibited at a national water quality conference where we had a chance to discuss our exciting double disc pump technology with engineers, end users and pump distributors. We addressed some of the most common issues/questions below:

Can a Double Disc Pump Have Ball Valves?

Yes. In fact, ball valve technology is helping to usher in the next era of double disc style pumps. The ball valves help to break up solids and make pumping thicker municipal sewage easier. The ball valves also make it much easier to maintain the pump. With the traditional clack valve style double disc pump, debris can get stuck in the clack and trunnions which may reduce pumping productivity. With a Sludge Pro® Double Disc Pump you simply open up the valve chambers, check for any debris and blockages and get back to business.  Just because one type of double disc pump has a clack valve doesn’t mean others have to.

Is The Term Double Disc Pump a Registered Trademark?

No. In fact, it is unlawful for any one manufacturer to place a registered trademark “®” designation next to the generic term “double disc pump”. It hurts competition and misleads consumers.

Do You Have to Crawl Under a Sludge Pro® Double Disc Pump to Conduct Maintenance Like You Do Other Makes?

Absolutely not. Wastecorp would never design a pump where an operator or maintenance person had to crawl underneath a pump with hundreds of lbs potentially hanging overhead. This poses a safety risk and may lead to serious injury or death.

Is there really a difference between the clack valve style double disc pump and Wastecorp’s Sludge Pro Double Disc Pumps?

Yes. First, the Sludge Pro® includes a hydraulic jacking system that raises the shaft so the trunnion and wet section can be worked on while the maintenance person is standing up. Who would want to crawl underneath a pump to conduct maintenance?  Second, municipal sewage involves a lot of grit and solids to be pumped. Wastecorp designed a disc pump better able to manage solids and thicker sewage.  Third, you won’t find swan necks or clack valves on a Sludge Pro® A pump that involves removing the swan neck to access the pump internals may cause reduced productivity at a WWTP.  Belt and pulleys are another time waster that you won’t find on a Sludge Pro® double disc pump. Energy efficient direct drive systems reduce the motor hp required so the sewage pumping operation can operate more efficiently.

What is the difference between a single housing design and a three housing design?

A three housing design doesn’t really mean anything. It is the preference of the pump manufacturer. However a three piece pump body design may lead to increased parts to replace and repair and possibly more down time for the facility. A single housing design may improve access to the pumps internals and reduce the amount of pump maintenance people needed to work on the pump.

What drive systems are available for double disc pumps?

Electric driven and engine driven (usually) diesel are preferred by most facilities.

Where can I find Engineering Specifications on Double Disc Pumps?

You can find them on wastecorp.com or click on this link and we will take you to the double disc pump selection page. You can also call Sludge Pro Double Disc Pumps at 1-888-829-2783 or email info@wastecorp.com

 

 

 

 

Orange County Waste Acceptance Facility Looks for Pump Solutions

Orange County Sewage Pumps

Orange County Sewage Pumps

Orange county is home to dozens of resorts, hotels and theme parks which generate tens of millions of gallons of wastewater that needs to be treated every year. When an Orlando, Florida renewable energy company earned a multiyear contract to accept waste from local resorts and theme parks, they needed severe duty pumps to transfer thick slurries and solids.

The details of the project called on the requirement of pumps to transfer ground up seafood shells, grease trap waste, utensils, animal renderings, wastewater and more. In this application, the waste is unloaded from a tanker into a waste pit. The waste is then transferred to a conveyor system which then separates most of the foreign objects like utensils, large solids, plastic bags and more. The remaining waste is sent through the Sludge Master plunger pump and then to the digesters of the wastewater treatment plant. With millions of people visiting Orlando resorts and theme parks every year, this amounts to a lot of waste, as tanker trucks deliver new loads of slurry like liquid waste around the clock. Continue reading