Planning for New Digester Pumps


As many know in the wastewater treatment industry, anaerobic digesters play a key part in biodegradable waste and sewage/sludge management. Many digesters, especially in northern areas of the USA are going through extensive refurbishment or replacement in recent years due to aging infrastructure and population expansion. Climate changes in the Northeast has also played a role in nudging local government to invest in sewage treatment pumping equipment as unpredictable storms can overload the system. New processes in the industry such as screens, grinder pumps have also helped to spur investment in new infrastructure.

Types of Digester Pumps

Plunger pumps, rotary lobe pumps, progressive cavity pumps and double disc pumps are the most common types of digester pumps. These technologies have all been around for decades, but plunger pumps remain one of the preferred pump technologies available to pump municipal sewage, food processing waste and more. One of the primary reasons for this is that as most operators know, sewage can be unpredictable in terms of grit content, thickness of the slurry or presence of solids or stringy material (common in municipal sewage) A plunger pump uses a cylinder to force the liquid from the suction to the discharge side of the pump. Rotary lobe pumps and progressive cavity pumps tend to use complicated engineering to transfer sewage which can clog up the pump which then needs to be disassembled and rebuilt. Plunger pumps are designed to handle variations in sewage and solids and they almost never clog. The only downside to these pump is that they are really not meant for straight water applications.

Who is Involved in Selecting Anaerobic Digestion Pumps?

Typically the city, town or municipality hires a consulting engineering firm to make recommendations on the types of pumps needed. Often, facility staff is valuable in contributing to the future of the new facility because they have seen which pumps work and those that have had problems. Pump manufacturers are also valuable partners in the selection process because they too have project experience and can help the consulting engineer save time and money in planning for the new pumping equipment.

Check out a project recently completed for the City of New York’s Hunts Point WPCP in the Bronx, NY. This case study shows a typical anaerobic digestion pump in action. More information is also available at Wastecorp.com

Trash Pump Manufacturing in North America

Trash pump manufacturing in North America: Wastecorp employee assembles a Trash Flow TFCC-M8, 8

Trash pump manufacturing in North America: Wastecorp employee assembles a Trash Flow TFCC-M8, 8″ diesel driven trash pump with pumping capabilities up to 2700 GPM.

There has been increasing media attention lately about manufacturing making a resurgence on North America shores. The trash pump manufacturing business is no different. But to companies like Wastecorp who has manufactured trash pumps, diaphragm pumps , plunger pumps and now double disc pumps on North American soil for over 20 years, we are slightly taken aback by the renewed focus.

Our Trash Flow Trash pumps are a good example about how manufacturing in North America, never really left. Over the last 18 months for example we have seen a nice surge in business from municipalities and industries looking for high quality trash pumps within a reasonable lead time. What does reasonable lead time mean in the world of trash pumps you might ask? With the Trash Flow, you are looking at between 3-7 week delivery on most of our models, ranging from bare pumps (simply replacing an old pump with a new one while utilizing the same motor or taking out a Gorman Rupp T Series and installing a new Trash Flow in its place) to engine driven trash pumps mounted on a trailer or skid mounted.

Now you might say “that’s great that you manufacture your pumps here, so what are the prices like?”. To clear up any misconceptions, the pricing of Trash Flow trash pumps are in many cases lower than comparable 2”-12” models with pumping capabilities up to 6300 GPM.

How to Pump Out Waste Oil

Waste oil and waste fluids pump out for cars

Waste oil and waste fluids pump out for cars

Pumping out waste motor oil, gear oil  and other fluids like coolant, and grease can be easy for auto repair jobs, boat service and repair and tractor service for farms and utility vehicles.  Wastecorp waste collection systems store old engine fluids in a waste tote tank and can be outfitted with mobile systems like the model you see here. This makes it easier to move around the service area to pump out oil from multiple cars, trucks, boats, tractors or even locomotives. The trick is to find the system that works best for your needs. The 100 gallon model that you see here is ideal for medium to large size service centers making it easy to pump out a days worth of vehicles without having to discharge the tank. Wastecorp also offers custom fleet specs for national service centers to integrate the pump out into the training program for employees. Contact Wastecorp to learn more about waste oil and fluid collection systems.